KareDrew Haiti Foundation
Notes from Matthew 25 House in Port au Prince
Posted on February 28th, 2011

Welcome to KareDrew’s new blog.  We’ve decided that this will be easier than the way we had been communicating in the past.

Matthew 25 House has been humming with activity since we arrived early in January.  Individuals, as well as groups or teams in all types of configurations based on their particular interest or mission have been arriving,  be it medical, dental, eye care, education, or simply to visit their twinned parish.

The activity has certainly kept up busy, and away from the computer, and hence the opportunity to communicate with all of you. However, at the same time it has provided KareDrew with some additional donations, as well as needed information, and suggestions in relation to our efforts, especially as they relate to the orphanages.

For the past week a medical team from Our Lady of Mount Carmel Church in Carmel, Indiana has been here with a mobile medical clinic.  As they have for the past three years, they’ve provided physical exams for all of the children at Melissa’s Hope, and Infants of Jesus orphanages.  We visited both of them twice within the past month, and we’d like to share some of the progress from both facilities.

Melissa’s Hope has been receiving quite a bit of structural rehab assistance from a Japanese organization.  They have rebuilt the security wall that had been damaged in the earthquake, while at the same time putting in a new septic and grey water drainage system.  It is so very much drier, and the mosquito population has noticeably decreased.  They have also funded roof repair, and new window screening.  All in all things appear to be in sound structural shape.

The children are doing quite well, and we are happy with the staff.  We arrived unannounced which we occasionally do, and found all of the children clean, well fed, and smiling. Pat, and I went out the first time with fellow KareDrew founder, and board member, Frank Fayne.  He was interested in learning about the school that Pascal has set up for children in the neighborhood whose families are too poor to send them. The more highly functioning residents of the orphanage attend also, and it keeps them from being too isolated. Hopefully KareDrew will be able to provide some extra training for teachers.

Food is provided each day with funding from an organization called “Love A Child.” The moms of several of the students volunteer their skills at food preparation. The only downside to all of the structural repair is that it has not been safe to let the wheelchair bound kids go outside until the workers leave for the day.  It limits those kids considerably.

It is the hope of Pascal, the director, to provide the children with daily physical therapy, and it is the hope of KareDrew to be able to provide the funding.  We are currently in the process of researching the cost, as well as the qualified individual who can provide the service.

Infants of Jesus now has 80 residents.  When we first became acquainted with them the total was 42.  The earthquake left more children in need of a home. That raised the number up to 60, which has increased yet again to 80, which I believe is about the facility’s capacity.

There is a Presbyterian church in Nashville, Tennessee that is going to come down here at the end of March to install a water purification system.  KareDrew has provided the orphanage with a small out building to house the system, as well as providing the cost to bring in the electricity necessary to run it.

We have also been providing $1,000 per month to offset the cost of food.  All of this was done before KareDrew became a formal organization.  It was just done through friends.  Now however, donors can receive a tax deduction.  It also gives Patrick Sr., Mary and me an opportunity to be more accountable.

Now the blog makes that even better, as we can keep in touch with all of you, as well as receive feedback, and ideas.

Thanks for “listening”.


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